Posts Tagged ‘Yeti’

Equipment Update

I thought I would take a few paragraphs and let you know how some camping and travel equipment fared.

Water storage – don’t bother.  I bought two different 5 gallon collapsables from Texsport and Coleman – they both were unweildy, leaky messes that turned green with algae after just a few uses.  Better to buy those handy 2.5 gallon jugs with spouts from the grocery store, refill them a couple times and then recycle them and buy new ones.

Sleeping mattress – this surprised the heck out of me.  I bought a really nice air mattress that was extra thick and also my Exped synmat which I use for backpacking.  The backpacking mattress won by a long shot.  Easier to blow up, took much, much less room and was way more comfortable to boot.  My back ached after a few days on the thick air mattress and cleared up after a few days on the smaller synmat. 

Fishing gear – each state charges a license fee and they can be pricey.   I left my rod and tackle box with my sister in San Francisco along with the air mattress.  This was disappointing, there should be a national license for travelers.  

Texsport stove – this was an A+ buy – look for a stove with a flexible hose for the gas canister.

Yeti Cooler – the best cooler ever.   I left two beers, yogurt and jam in the cooler for two weeks in the heat in Pittsburgh, when I opened it I expected it to be super stinky – to my surprise,  the water was still cool and I salvaged the beer and jam.    I love this cooler!

Towels – I have no idea where they go, but they must decide they like it where they are and stay without even saying goodbye. 

Cathy

 

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Liberty, life aboard a docked sail boat.

Talking with my friend Geri today about living aboard a boat.  Geri suggested I write a blog about it, so…here ya go.

Liberty is a 37′ sloop, which is a sailboat with one mast.  There is power from shore and a great wi-fi connection from the harbor.

Water – go get the hose and fill the two on-board water tanks.  One tank feeds the kitchen, foot pumped, and the other the bathroom sink.  There is a marine toilet, so no solid waste, but if you have to pee at night it is a lifesaver.  Just saying.   Hot water,  put a kettle on.

Galley – that’s the kitchen for you landlubbers.  A small gas stove and sink, there is a cooler, but I prefer to use my Yeti.  I have been making most of my meals here and have become very efficient at washing dishes in a tiny sink, there is no garbage disposal and you have to be careful of what you put in there because it drains out to the bay.  I am using an enviro washing soap.

Berth – the bed is luxurious.  A custom made mattress, very comfy.  No heat, but a small electric heater, I get it all warm and toasty before we turn in.

Main shower and bathroom are on land, about a 3 minute walk.   First you take off the 3 boards which are the main cabin door, then up over the side of the boat and jump down to the dock, up the main ramp to the main dock, down the main dock to the beach and over to the building which houses the showers.  There is a super fancy french restaurant in the building called Le Garage, I stopped in once and $$$$$$$ oooo la la.

There is a nice “Captain’s” seating area which would normally have maps and charts but now houses my computer and reference materials.  I can stream shows to my mini and that is how I watch tv or movies.

There are a lot of boats anchored off the docks.  I counted over 100.  The guys who live on them are called “anchor outs”, a scruffy group of gentlemen who have been nothing but kind to me and Edgar.  They come into shore in an array of different skiffs and park them on the dock next to mine.  A neighborhood of sorts, I like it.

Edgar is having a hard time adjusting to the rock and sway of the boat and fell off the steps more than once.  I tried to get him to jump off the boat to the dock and he did it twice, but, I think it is just too far for the little guy.  I lift him on and off.

So, we are snug as two bugs in a rug.

The boat is being dry-docked for a few days on the 23rd of this month.  I would like to go gold panning while I am off the boat.   Has anyone done it?  Where is the best place in N. California?

Cathy

Cooking in the Great Outdoors

Camp stove?  I carry a Snowpeak giga for backpacking and have chosen the Texsport high output dual burner stove for base camp, it got great ratings all over the board and importantly has a flexible hose to connect the propane – that seemed to be a weak point on other stoves I checked out.

Backpacking cook wear? I have the titanium tiWare  from REI and find it heats evenly and quickly and cleans easily.  Base camp, went with the all too heavy cast iron from Lodge, one of the advantages is a no soap clean-up.

Cooler – Yeti.  I chose the 35qt because of size limitations in the trunk.  This cooler can handle dry ice and grizzlies.  The Yeti can keep ice for 7 days in heat, is practically indestructible and grizzly country approved.  It also makes a great desk, step stool and seat.

The indispensable items are aluminum foil, zip bags, garbage bags, spice, beans, dry pasta, bullion – both chicken and vegetable, brown rice, tea, instant coffee, pancake mix and syrup, honey and oatmeal, GORP – good old raisins and peanuts, to which I add some good old m&m’s.

I love Lara Bars – look at the ingredient labels and compare to other food bars, can’t beat a label with only 4 ingredients and I can pronounce them all!  I also have some Clif Bars for long hikes.

I sure would appreciate your input on some great camp recipes – s’more’s I got.

Cathy